Success With Emotional Intelligence

The term emotional intelligence, shortened as EI, has something to do with the skill, the capability, or aptitude to single out, evaluate, and deal with one’s emotions and the emotions of other people.

Contrasting propositions as to how emotional formation DISC intelligence should be defined and used in the different fields of interest are still on the spotlight. Nevertheless, regardless of the differing definition and usage of the notion of emotional intelligence in certain subject matters of which is deemed purely technical, still the term’s etymology can be drawn from one of the works of Charles Darwin, particularly on the relevance of emotional expression for subsistence or survival and second adaptation.

Albeit conventional denotations of the word intelligence gave emphasis to the cognitive domains during the 1900s, a number of prominent scholars in the study of the field of intelligence had started to acknowledge the significance of the non-cognitive domains. As an example, the term social intelligence, which describes the capacity of comprehending and managing other people, was used as early as 1920. The term emotional intelligence had been first used to attribute to the doctoral thesis of Wayne Payne, which is entitled A Study of Emotion: Developing Emotional Intelligence. But before this scholarly piece, the term emotional intelligence had emerged in Leuner.

In some researches, EI and job performance has a positive correlation. A compensatory paradigm between IQ and EI offered by Cote and Miners posits that the correlation between emotional intelligence and job performance becomes quite positive as cognitive intelligence decreases. In 2004, this idea was first proposed by Petrides (et. al.) in the context of academic performance. The aftermath of the previous research corroborated the compensatory paradigm which suggests that employees with low intelligence quotient get higher task performance and organizational citizenship attitude directed at the organization per se, the higher their emotional intelligence.

So much with defining the concept of emotional intelligence; let us deal now with how to improve an individual’s emotional intelligence. It is conspicuously empirical the individuals having high EI have higher and better chances of attaining success in all the aspects of life. Before you begin to take ┬áconsider some of the principles that are in a way helpful to ameliorate the EI of a person. It is expected that after perusing this article, all the ideas embedded herein will be incorporated to the readers as their own.

1) Deference

This word is not merely a string of linguistic symbols associated with sounds and conveys a meaning. It is more than how it is being delineated in dictionaries and encyclopedia. It is not something one can acquire from drastic means but is achievable through the course of time. Unless people will not manifest it to others, this remains an empty concept.

Respect is one strong foundation of developing one’s EI. If you want others to respect you, you have to learn first how to respect their feelings or emotions. In doing so, mutual deference is then built up. The golden rule emphasizes that “do unto others what you want others do unto you”. When your office-mate is in big trouble regardless of whatever problem that may be, you should show empathy and compassion, and try to find feasible solutions that can alleviate his or her problem. If your friend has a different belief because of his religious affiliation, then try not to get into a religious talk that might offend him or her. Remaining silent, sometimes is the best way to show respect